Electric Vehicles etc

mark22

Likes Dirt
This is a prime example of why autonomous driving is the future. There are owner that are dumb enough to do this shit and they are out on the road!:eek:
Looks like they used to specify transmission/drive unit oil changes on earlier models but like a fair few manufacturers it is not a service item now. I saw a takedown on one, it looks a very complicated item.
 

Stredda

Runs naked through virgin scrub
Oh that's easy. It'll be just like a phone. Anything more than a fractured outer casing or some busted glass will see the car scrapped. Won't be much need for collision repairs in the future.... progress, eh?

[sigh]
That’s no different to most cars today. They are written off if there‘s much more than bolt on part replacement. You’ll never see a car built in the last 20 years get something like a rear quarter replacement or a new roof skin welded in. It’s just not cost effective.
 

Scotty T

2.6 inches
That’s no different to most cars today. They are written off if there‘s much more than bolt on part replacement. You’ll never see a car built in the last 20 years get something like a rear quarter replacement or a new roof skin welded in. It’s just not cost effective.
Yeah, the myths are flying hard and fast these days as ICE dies. There are people out there who think you can't drive EV''s on rough roads or in the wet.
 

Haakon

Call me Ken, whoreken
Hybrid adds to the complexity but in some cases BEV would reduce complexity.

No spark plugs, MAF sensors, boost sensors, fuel pumps, filters, automatic transmissions blah blah


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
But to be fair, the Toyota hybrid is probably the most reliably ICE drivetrain ever made - stupidly long lived.
 

silentbutdeadly

Eats Squid
Its
I think that's an exaggeration. EV's have not reached the critical mass where it becomes economical to repair a major crash. Anything where spares are available and the expertise exists the repair is just like an ICE vehicle. If I had the same bingle in a Tesla as the last one I had I probably could have kept driving as it wouldn't have caved my radiator disabling the car.
It's not an exaggeration... it's what happens now! Why would a BEV change that?
 

Haakon

Call me Ken, whoreken
That 500M is unlikley to cover one state though.
Probably not. But, its a start. Also, it will be designed to send a signal to markets - there are a lot of private sector players in the charging game, or more accurately its basically all private sectors - Tesla, Tritium etc etc. VWs Electrify America network.

So what government is doing here is more about putting some foundations in, sending the clear signal the EVs are now welcomed and encouraged in Australia for a change and that its safe to invest in.
 

tubby74

Likes Bikes and Dirt
just back from first road trip in the EV. good and bad to it.

Good - its a great highway cruiser, keeps speed up hills with no effort, no revs or dropping a gear. Chargers are just under 2 hours apart, about 60% of the full battery. charging is very fast with the automatic preconditioning, got just under 1000 km/h charge rate in gundagai and never waited for a stall. Superchargers cost 69c kw/h, more than even peak rates at home and a lot more than overnight (24c) but still cheaper than petrol in most cases. The app would not connect in gundagai (vodaphone black spot) or even in canberra despite decent cell signal. This means you have to guess or go back to the car to see how charging is going. The rate can halve if someone pulls into the adjacent charger so its nice to now these things and take your time over the coffee.
With the large boot, frunk and storage under the boot floor, it loads up almost as well as a full sized station wagon for a family trip.

downsides - you're locked into where to stop. We usually stop in gundagai but wander around the old town, the railway station and bridge. We could do that but still require a 20 minute stop at the services. Reach albury at 40% charge so had to top up a bit for the stay, then again before heading back. The hotel had 4 off brand chargers, which i didnt have an adapter for and which were always parked out in the evening by whoever got there late so was out and back to the charger as needed. Goulburn supercharger is just the far end of a park from the main street where we'd usually stop. bit of a quiet spot if you were alone late at night though. Canberra charger is stuck out near the airport so sort of out of the way. got back to sydney on a single charge though. Took 25% more charge heading south than north.


Autopilot and phantom braking. It was dangerously bad. Anyone parked off the road, brake. A truck parked in a truck bay 20 metres off the road, slam on the brakes. Half a dozen other times i couldn't even figure out what it saw. I found the setting to turn emergency braking off but you have to do that every time you get in. Was constantly aware of leaving large gaps behind cars when overtaking before i found this just in case the car freaked out again.

Auto steer - lethal. Tried it twice on clear stretches and didnt get to 30 seconds with it It tried to follow the solid line on the left which was a turn off into a farm gate. I was still holding the wheel straight but what would have happened when it hit the gravel at 110?

Overall its a decent car for the trip, but would still be very aware of where i was planning to go. Eg jindabyne I could get there fine, but if going up and down to thredbo would I have access to even an outdoor socket each night where I was staying, I can see myself using this over my wifes ICE for bike trips where i can plan ahead and am only taking 1 bike.
 

gippyz

Likes Dirt
Autopilot and phantom braking. It was dangerously bad. Anyone parked off the road, brake. A truck parked in a truck bay 20 metres off the road, slam on the brakes. Half a dozen other times i couldn't even figure out what it saw. I found the setting to turn emergency braking off but you have to do that every time you get in. Was constantly aware of leaving large gaps behind cars when overtaking before i found this just in case the car freaked out again.

Auto steer - lethal. Tried it twice on clear stretches and didnt get to 30 seconds with it It tried to follow the solid line on the left which was a turn off into a farm gate. I was still holding the wheel straight but what would have happened when it hit the gravel at 110?
What car is this @tubby74? I had the same problem with the MG HS loanee car from the dealership when my car was being fixed. Apparently the reason why you have to switch them all off all the time is because of the safety requirement as otherwise the car won't even pass safety check!
 

gippyz

Likes Dirt
In my case, the battery is still ok as we managed to still drive the car home. So I don't think the charger shortcircuited the board in the car or damaged the battery.

The clicking sound, I think, is the car's failed attempt to lock the charger. If it can't lock the charger, then it won't charge the car. We didn't get any error messages at all, which was super strange. Initially we thought something was wrong with our home charger. If that is the case, we thought it's easy as we just go and buy a new one. But, it doesn't seem to be the case as the parts ordered are for the car.

So, either the car's locking mechanism malfunctioned after receiving some weird feedback from the nrma charger or that we already have some issues with the charger locking mechanism beforehand which we didn't know. If it is the latter, then it should've been picked up by the dealership (the same one the car is in now) during our yearly service.
So the car is back. The receipt said it's EVSE failure code C182C00, and they replaced the control module. Warranty replacement - didn't pay a cent. Googled the error code, and found this ev forum entry (https://www.speakev.com/threads/dc-fast-charger-communication-problems.167828/). The person has similar problem except he managed to subsequently charge the car.
 
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