The cooking thread

Dales Cannon

Cur non isti mictum ex occasione?
Staff member
I assume you will have to wait for the cook book to be posted online to his cooking vlogs before you will find out - I do them pretty much like a baked onion when doing the roast veggies - oil salt pepper garlic powder - cut off chunks big enough (onion size) and bake away - normally for about 90 mins on 190 devs fan forced - but my oven runs hotter than the temp suggests
Might have a go with the air fryer.
 

pink poodle

aka stickchops
Really useful recipe.
Oh you want a recipe? Cut leeks across like sawing up a tree. Oil your pan, add some crushed garlic if you like. Place leeks on oil then flip over. salt the top...oven at 160⁰c and flip them when they start to soften etc.

Be careful not to use too much oil and keep heat moderate. You want them to caramelize not burn. You can cover/seal them and they will steam up a little at the start which sometimes helps with getting the soft delicious goo factor happening and delaying the burn.

If all else fails get a Welsh whiskey and set your leeks on fire.
 

pink poodle

aka stickchops
Might have a go with the air fryer.

I think the air fryer could dry them out.

Brussels in the air fry are awesome. Last year when I was teaching cooking (yes...I actually did that) we used an air fryer quite a bit. For a while (though I don't have one myself) it was my favourite way to make a rich nap sauce.
 

Freediver

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Oh you want a recipe? Cut leeks across like sawing up a tree. Oil your pan, add some crushed garlic if you like. Place leeks on oil then flip over. salt the top...oven at 160⁰c and flip them when they start to soften etc.

Be careful not to use too much oil and keep heat moderate. You want them to caramelize not burn. You can cover/seal them and they will steam up a little at the start which sometimes helps with getting the soft delicious goo factor happening and delaying the burn.

If all else fails get a Welsh whiskey and set your leeks on fire.
If you zap them too soften them up a bit before roasting it helps, you can use a higher heat without the fear of burnt outside raw middle. Sticking a toothpick or rosemary twig through them to stop the middle bits popping out as the outer rings shrink is also a good idea.
 

pink poodle

aka stickchops
If you zap them too soften them up a bit before roasting it helps, you can use a higher heat without the fear of burnt outside raw middle. Sticking a toothpick or rosemary twig through them to stop the middle bits popping out as the outer rings shrink is also a good idea.
Rosemary "skewer" is a killer idea for extra flavour.

I just had scrambled eggs with coriander "pesto", chilli, and cheese. I wanted to make up some chimichurri a few weeks ago but I like coriander more than parsley. made it up as a pesto and add to vinegar etc as required. It probably needs its own name... ummmm yuckweed goo for those that don't like coriander and tingly flavour juice for those that do. Anyway I've been finding it quite versatile. Goes great on meat pre cook or in salad dressings.


No photo of the eggs, they were not photogenic but delicious.
 

Dales Cannon

Cur non isti mictum ex occasione?
Staff member
Oh you want a recipe? Cut leeks across like sawing up a tree. Oil your pan, add some crushed garlic if you like. Place leeks on oil then flip over. salt the top...oven at 160⁰c and flip them when they start to soften etc.

Be careful not to use too much oil and keep heat moderate. You want them to caramelize not burn. You can cover/seal them and they will steam up a little at the start which sometimes helps with getting the soft delicious goo factor happening and delaying the burn.

If all else fails get a Welsh whiskey and set your leeks on fire.
I buyed a leek.
 

beeb

Dr. Beebenson, PhD HA, ST, Offset (hons)
Chicken stew

Chicken Marylands (x2),
Potatoes (x3)
Large carrot (x1)
Pumpkin (1/6th, peeled and dried-seeded)
Green beans (2 large handfuls, chopped)
Chick peas (1 tin, drained)
Brown onion (x1)
Garlic cloves (x2)
Pitted prunes (x10, halved)
Red wine (merlot, 1/2 cup)
Vegetable stock (1.5 litres)
Fresh lemon thyme (decent pinch)
Smoked paprika (1 tsps)
Orange rind (1/2 tsps).

Served it on pearl cous cous cooked in veggie stock with a big chunk of Mersey Valley vintage cheddar melted through.

Bloody hell! What a meal. Prunes totally dissolved to lend a slightly sweet background note and take the sharp edge off the red wine that can sometimes make stewed chook taste a bit bitter. Very faint orange aroma but not overpowering in the slightest. Proud of that for something I threw together freehand. :)
DA0D73A6-7CA1-4351-8A6B-74D8FF347349.jpeg
 
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Dales Cannon

Cur non isti mictum ex occasione?
Staff member
Since being diagnosed as a glutard a few years ago I am very rarely able to enjoy my favourite dessert which is the cake of cheeses. My baking skills are pretty average but I thought I would give a recipe or two a go yesterday given the wonderful weather.

They worked a treat. I experimented with three bases and all three were good. Probably prefer the walnut base but the others are good too. The same basic cheesecake goo mix was used. Unfortunately I thought I would be clever and bake these in muffin tins to store them as a serving but the tins liked the cheesecakes so much they refused to release them. Next time I will either cook them in patty cake papers or just in ramekins.

These were two bases, the first a gf flour/walnut mix and the second almond flour. I made a third using crushed up gf shortbread and they were good too. These are the bases after cooking for 10 minutes.

The goo spooned in and ready for the oven.

And the outcome. As you can see the base and goo stuck solidly and had to be surgically extracted, the top left is an attempt to get it out and that busted it up. Still taste ok and I called it cheesecake destroyed with icecream. Maybe lifting the bases after the first bake will mean it can all come out. I managed to extract one out of the nine I made.


You could easily make a normal shaped cheesecake with a cake pan but these were for individual serves and a test.

To make 6 40mL ramekins you need:

1/4 cup of gf plain flour or normal plain flour if you are normal
1/4 cup of smashed walnuts (leave a few chunky bits)
1 to 2 tablespoons of melted butter to combine it all
1 tablespoon of brown sugar

or:
1/2 cup of almond flour
1 tablespoon of brown sugar
1 to 2 tablespoons of melted butter

or:
1/2 cup of mashed up shortbread biscuits like Scottish fingers
1 tablespoon of brown sugar
1 tablespoon of melted butter
1 imperial pinch of salt

Mix all the base ingredients together until it looks like breadcrumbs, you might need to add a bit more butter or a bit more floury stuff depending on how you go and then pack it into the bottom of the ramekins. Bake at 175C for 10minutes.

Then make the goo:

1x 250g pack of cream cheese
50mL or a bit under 1/4 cup of brown sugar
1 pinch salt
1 egg
1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon of lemon juice

Agress upon the cream cheese in a mixer until it fluffs up then add sugar and salt and mix until combined. Add the egg and throw in the vanilla and lemon juice. You do this while the bases are baking so it doesn't start to harden before you need to pour it into the ramekins.
Bake at 150C for 20minutes. Cheesecake are done if they are firm on top but still jiggle like the things we all love. Refrigerate for one to two hours before eating.

Totally worth it.
 

ozzybmx

call me Cáitín
Previous house had no grill in the oven. New place does. There was some catching up to do!

Didn't help that the local shops had pepper Mersey Valley cheese on special either. One of life's true gourmet pleasures!
I have a simple palate. The fact you have been able to hide the beans with melted Mersey Valley has made my mouth water.

Cheesy beans on toast coming up for lunch :)
 
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