The cooking thread

Oddjob

Can hench anywhere any time
Nope, I very rarely cook to a recipe tbh. I think it sounds harder than it is though. It’s still mostly a one-pot meal aside from hauling the meat out for a bit once browned.

Agreed on the margarine, but Mum remains convinced it’s the “healthier” option.
The stuff with sterols in it is better for you on toast but for cooking butter is better. It's because animal fats are more stable under temperature compared to vegetable oils which can break down into trans fats.

Sent from my M2012K11AG using Tapatalk
 

beeb

Dr. Beebenson, PhD HA, ST, Offset (hons)
Got inspired by the recipe I posted above, but I didn’t have any rabbit so went on a bit of a tangent and just freestyled. Ended up with an ‘Orange chicken stew’ (with both orange rind and orange water). Two chicken “Maryland” pieces, roughly a cup of peeled lightly roasted almonds, half-cup of raisins, three sliced carrots, 2 onions (diced), garlic (4 cloves, chopped), pinch of cumin, allspice, cinnamon and a bit of oregano. Couple of tins of diced tomatoes and and a box pre-made low-salt veggie stock. Cheesy cous cous on the side with zucchini and green beans.

It was sweet and aromatic, and the meat was falling-apart tender after simmering for 1hr20m after being browned earlier in the cooking process.
383922


Definitely serves more than one in the quantity I made… :oops:
 
Last edited:

beeb

Dr. Beebenson, PhD HA, ST, Offset (hons)
Porterhouse steak (thick cut and cooked medium rare), mushroom red wine and pepper gravy, potato and carrot fritters, fried asparagus (with a splash of lemon juice once cooked but still sitting in the pan), and steamed broccoli and peas.
384115


It was gooooooooooooooood.:)
 

Halo1

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Here is a good one to follow for Palak Paneer.
I make this about once a month and find a mixture of silverbeet, english spinach and baby spinich works best.

edit try this one
 
Last edited:

Freediver

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Here is a good one to follow for Palak Paneer.
I make this about once a month and find a mixture of silverbeet, english spinach and baby spinich works best.
https://youtube.com/playlist?list=RDCMUCDesLeycMNYu_vM8_LtGIQw&playnext=1
It's something I make from time to time as well, I've had a few goes at making the paneer as well but it isn't as good as the bought stuff.
I watched a little bit of that video, just enough to go WTF. You might want to check that it's the right one.
 

Halo1

Likes Bikes and Dirt
It's something I make from time to time as well, I've had a few goes at making the paneer as well but it isn't as good as the bought stuff.
I watched a little bit of that video, just enough to go WTF. You might want to check that it's the right one.
Ok i think I fixed the link. F if I know what you tube is doing . The original Link worked for me.
The video is It’s a bit annoying to watch but it is the only method that seems to work for me.
 
Last edited:

beeb

Dr. Beebenson, PhD HA, ST, Offset (hons)
Rosti looks mighty good @beeb. Why not cut up the greens to cook with asparagus and save fluffing about?
Ta poods. I seperated the greens as I don’t like the flavours of broccoli and asparagus when they get cooked together.

Steamer was (quite literally) on the back-burner, and asparagus only takes a few minutes on another hob with a little olive oil. One extra pan to wash wasn’t the end of the world.
 

pink poodle

Our man isn't in the West
The ham-pocalypse is nigh!

I have entered into the phase of emotionally preparing myself for baking a ham.
Stage one is now complete...the glaze has been prepared and will spend a day or two infusing. Given the "holy fuck that's cheap!!!!" moment I had at the grocery store I decided to use limes. This is something simple I whipped up and juggled for a balance on the stove top. 1:1 lime juice and honey, to which I added additional lime juice and zest as it simmered away because I wanted to boost the acidity. There is 2 pinches of salt and maybe 3 teaspoons of fennel seeds and an amount of chilli seeds I just winged. The taste is quite zesty! Once it has infused in the fridge it should put a nice kick on the ham. I am looking forward to layering this on what looks like a pretty smokey piece of ham in a couple of days.

384131


384132


Maestro select daiquiri to support the process.
 

pink poodle

Our man isn't in the West
Well it all turned into a bit of a race against the clock, but the ham came out pretty good. Visually it isn't my best work, but it is acceptable and absolutely delicious. Mum got a new puppy a few days ago (Hungarian Puli) and I might have payed with it for a bit longer than I should have. So the ham really had to go to schedule to be done in time to pack away before work. Then I ran out of glaze after the second coat so had to rush another batch while the ham was in the oven. General advice is every 15 minutes, but I wanted really layer it on so was basting every 10 minutes. By the time for the third coat I noticed the fat end of the leg was getting a bit of char so dropped the oven temp a bit as well. There was a glaze boil over and the stove top is fucked up. But the ham-pocalypse has came and I am now in ham-topia! If you haven't glazed a ham before but want to, do it! It is really simple, fantastic to eat, and not as time consuming as you think. All up this 3kg was maybe 1.25 hours of work (1 hour baking and about 15 minutes making the first batch of glaze).

behold...

384201



384202
 

pink poodle

Our man isn't in the West
Turkey is in...going for a brandy, garlic, and sage steam bath to get it done, then either a high heat oven of bbq sear to crisp up the skin. House is smelling good...time for an eggnog!
 

Hools

Likes Dirt
My first time on the ham. Not a complete failure! Tasted good despite the burnt glaze. I brined the ham for 24 hrs before baking and glazing, kept it juicy and flavourful. The maple and mustard glaze I used was very thick, will try a Guinness glaze next time.
 
Top