Plastic bags, climate change, renewable energy,

rockmoose

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Yep. Not sure what rainfall has been like annually, my Dad's property in SA has had an above average soaking this year after losing half of it in the fires in 2019. If rainfall has been higher nationally maybe the fiery apocalypse can be staved off until the Summer of 2022-23.
Alternatively, all that bonus winter growth provides more fuel to burn, when it all turns crispy.
 

Haakon

Call me Ken, whoreken
Yep. Not sure what rainfall has been like annually, my Dad's property in SA has had an above average soaking this year after losing half of it in the fires in 2019. If rainfall has been higher nationally maybe the fiery apocalypse can be staved off until the Summer of 2022-23.
Nah, that just grows more fuel. It will dry out in a week when the first heat wave hits...
 

pink poodle

Our man isn't in the West
If fires and general weather in the Northern hemisphere during our winter are a sign of what is to come in our next summer... we are fucked.
Nothing to worry about! The climate crisis false news is over...a Canadian ski field has recorded their first snow fall for the season.
 

silentbutdeadly

Eats Squid
This coming summer 'should' be OK for eastern Australia but after that...

They're currently trying to do HR burns around here but the weather is too cool and the landscape too juicy.

However, given that the blocks being burnt are mostly sacrificial from an ecological perspective in order to meet political targets (and the risk modelling says their fuel loads are mostly dirt anyway)... no-one seems too concerned.
 

pink poodle

Our man isn't in the West
Today I had a realisation about a direct impact of global warming on Australian life that I haven't heard many people talking about, and I think this is a serious concern for all of us. Currently snakes generally hibernate for a few months of the year. Imagine how savage those pricks are going to be when their batteries are full of juice all year!!!
 

Flow-Rider

Wheel size expert
There's going to be some awful problems across the world with global warming, fruit and vegetable growers face some big challenges.


Drought and Heat Harm Brazil’s Harvest
December 23, 2020Brazil

harvest
Lack of rain withered this commercial citrus orchard in Jales (north São Paulo state). The photo was taken in October 2020.
By Maurício Mendes
There is a saying among those who have been in the industry for a long time: “There is no citrus harvest like the other.” Growers are facing production challenges in the current harvest season in Brazil.
HOT, DRY CONDITIONS
The first signs of a decrease in the season’s fruit crop were given by last year’s (August to September 2019) bloom. This was a period with limited rainfall and high temperatures that caused fruitlet drop. Fruits grew up to 2 to 3 centimeters in diameter but were then overturned by excessive heat. In some regions, trees bloomed again in December 2019, which was not enough to compensate for previous losses.
The period from May to October 2020 without rainfall was one of the most extensive droughts ever recorded in the Brazilian citrus belt. In addition to the extended drought, heat waves caused considerable weight and fruit-quality impairment.
Overall fruit losses were greatest in the northern part of São Paulo state and in Triângulo Mineiro (an area in the west of Minas Gerais state) — the driest and hottest regions of the citrus belt.
The first crop forecast released by Fundecitrus in September 2020 was for production of 287.8 million boxes of oranges, 25 percent lower than in the previous crop season (2019–2020). This forecast was revised in December to 269 million boxes of oranges, indicating another 6.4 percent loss.
The hot, dry climate caused extremely withered orchards. With irrigation only available in approximately 27 percent of the citrus belt, many growers could not fully irrigate trees.
Because of uneven flowering from August 2019 to January 2020, trees will bear a large proportion of ripe fruits grown after the normal flowering period (August to September 2019), mixed with unripe fruits grown later. This characteristic will certainly hinder the next harvest, increasing picking costs. Furthermore, the mixture of such fruits from different flowering periods during harvest will impair the quality of juice produced, especially due to the high amounts of limonin in the orange peel. In the northern region of the citrus belt, fruits are ripening fast, which will cause increases much higher than normal in the soluble sugar to acidity ratio.

https://citrusindustry.net/2020/12/23/drought-and-heat-harm-brazils-harvest/
 

The Duckmeister

Has stumpy thumbs, Speciaized are so weird
Today I had a realisation about a direct impact of global warming on Australian life that I haven't heard many people talking about, and I think this is a serious concern for all of us. Currently snakes generally hibernate for a few months of the year. Imagine how savage those pricks are going to be when their batteries are full of juice all year!!!
What is more likely is a large shunt in active season rather than an increase in activity. More environmental heat isn't necessarily a good thing; reptiles are just as prone to overheating as the rest of us, and it can kill them (I've had a pet lizard die from overheating because she got stuck and couldn't get out of the sun :( ). As it is now, snakes & lizards are rarely seen during the really hot parts of the day, rather early mornings and late afternoons. A fairly possible scenario is more activity in winter, but much less in summer as they try to stay cool; switching to night shift in the height of summer may become more common (some species in some areas are already semi-nocturnal when the ambient conditions suit them).

Their "savageness" to paraphrase your ineloquence, won't really change (most really aren't anyway).
 
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pink poodle

Our man isn't in the West
What is more likely is a large shunt in active season rather than an increase in activity. More environmental heat isn't necessarily a good thing; reptiles are just as prone to overheating as the rest of us, and it can kill them (I've had a pet lizard die from overheating because she got stuck and couldn't get out of the sun :( ). As it is now, snakes & lizards are rarely seen during the really hot parts of the day, rather early mornings and late afternoons. A fairly possible scenario is more activity in winter, but much less in summer as they try to stay cool; switching to night shift in the height of summer may become more common (some species in some areas are already semi-nocturnal when the ambient conditions suit them).

Their "savageness" to paraphrase your ineloquence, won't really change (most really aren't anyway).
I'm still predicting Godzilla sized snakes! Snakezilla!
 

pink poodle

Our man isn't in the West
So the weather here has been warm and sunny for the late week and a bit, like pleasant late spring. I am a bit weary of people pulling the "isn't the weather wonderful?" Small talk on me. No, its global warming.
 
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