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Alexxx

Likes Dirt
I've got an ACR resqlink but only use it for hiking not MTB but it should stand up to any abuse in a hydropack. I had a SPOT for years but mobile coverage is so good now I just share my location on Google maps if I'm going somewhere solo.
 

bigdamo

Likes Bikes
Mobile coverage not so great where I live. I certainly wouldn't depend on it. I'm thinking response times would be quicker on PLB and I just have to hit a button not stuff around ringing people telling them to find me on google maps which I wonder what the accuracy of google maps is like.Plus hoping my mobile survived the crash.
 
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Alexxx

Likes Dirt
Most of them come with GPS but worth checking as it will make it easier for them to find you.
For those using your phone I would recommend getting the emergency plus app, I've used it to provide lat long to 000 and get some paramamedics to an injured rider.
 

Comic Book Guy

Likes Dirt
PLBs are pretty robust and will survive in a backpack. I have access to one for bushwalking and it gets bashed around in my backpack without issue. The battery has to be warrantied to hold enough charge to operate for a minimum number of hours. The plb will work after the battery expiration date but is not guaranteed to operate for the minimum time required. More information here: https://beacons.amsa.gov.au/

Apps like the Emergency+ one are useful as well. Link to triple zero info: https://www.triplezero.gov.au/triple-zero/smartphone-applications . Or you can have an app like a gps logger than gives you a location that you can give to 000.

Pretty sure all plbs have a gps built in now. Remember reading somewhere that 45 minutes was the average response time for a gps enabled unit.

Important thing to remember is that if you have an accident and end up on the ground unconscious then the plb is not much use. Ride with friends and/or make sure someone knows where you are and a rough idea when you will be back.

CBG.
 

bigdamo

Likes Bikes
Yep ending up on the ground unconscious then the plb is not much use neither is a mobile.

Sometimes it ain't easy to organise people to go riding with you if you work odd days ie you work on weekends week days off but yep definitely better riding with someone BUT I once while out MTBing with a group of friends I was riding mid pack but we were distanced not close to each other going done a steep hill at speed I misjudged how fast I was going and came out wide on the exit of the turn just clipped a tree with my left hand which spun me around hit the tree with my head as I was spinning around and flew off into the thick bush landing about 4 metres in the scrub unconscious. I don't know how long I was out for but my friends rode back and couldn't see me until I came to and I walked out. The only reason I got up and didn't lye there longer was I was concerned about bull ants and snakes.
 

bear the bear

Is a real bear
Suggest the Garmin Inreach, and like most of the services, it is subscription-based.
Have used a SPOT in the past but they were a bit big.
 

mark22

Likes Dirt
I was camping at Robinson gorge Qld last year and spoke to a couple who had a sat phone that they could not get it to work within the gorge. Between the narrow walls and the tree cover not a great mix. I guess if you were injured alone and couldn't crawl out of gorge it might not end well.
There is zero mobile coverage out that way unless you climb up a decent hill and then it's marginal probably text only.

For info for you guys if you need to call emergency services within a mobile coverage area you can call 112 it will use any available terrestrial mobile network providing your handset is capable of that frequency.
This will get you to the Telstra operated 000 service.

PLB's are the most reliable I reckon but have limitations previously discussed
 

bigdamo

Likes Bikes
I have a pretty rugged mob phone IP66/IP69K rating drop in water to a depth of 1.5mtr for 30 min MIL-STD-810G rating for dust, shocks and vibration a 5580ah battery and it has the best phone reception of all the mobile phones I have owned better than any blue tick testra phones but is big and heavy compared to the other mobiles I have had still a good phone but it goes in the backpack. I have broken a couple of mobile phones MTBing.

The PLB are small now I can wear it on my MTB shorts not sure how they will stand up to MTB abuse.

378303
 

EsPeGe

Likes Dirt
So since about 2010ish (Don't quote me) all new PLB's operated on 406Mhz and provides a GPS lat/long. They used to operate on 121.5 Mhz and 243 Mhz (for the military) and there are still old beacons out there using 121.5Mhz. They provide an audible signal only and we frequently get calls in the control tower at work from AusSAR (the organisation responsible for search and rescue in Australia) asking us to see if aircraft can hear a beacon. When you dial up 121.5 you get a very distincntive Whoop Whoop tone that an aircraft with the right gear can home in on.

406 beacons have the ability to be received by satelite and can still be homed on as I believe they still also (again not 100% sure so don't quote me) transmit a signal on 121.5, but also has the GPS which gets the searchers close then the tone guides them to the spot although the Lat/Long is usually on the spot anyway.

So all that being said I run a ResQlink like Alexxx does. I don't use it for mtb but when I'm splitboarding out in the backcountry. I've had it for about 10 years and its had 2 battery updates in that time but I think the new battery is a 10 year life. I've also taken it to Alaska, Kashmir, Japan and the US on snowboard trips.

I don't see an issue with having one for MTB, especially if it gives you or your loved ones piece of mind. They take up stuff all room, weigh bugger all and from my experience in aviation they work.
 

fatboyonabike

Captain obvious
So since about 2010ish (Don't quote me) all new PLB's operated on 406Mhz and provides a GPS lat/long. They used to operate on 121.5 Mhz and 243 Mhz (for the military) and there are still old beacons out there using 121.5Mhz. They provide an audible signal only and we frequently get calls in the control tower at work from AusSAR (the organisation responsible for search and rescue in Australia) asking us to see if aircraft can hear a beacon. When you dial up 121.5 you get a very distincntive Whoop Whoop tone that an aircraft with the right gear can home in on.

406 beacons have the ability to be received by satelite and can still be homed on as I believe they still also (again not 100% sure so don't quote me) transmit a signal on 121.5, but also has the GPS which gets the searchers close then the tone guides them to the spot although the Lat/Long is usually on the spot anyway.

So all that being said I run a ResQlink like Alexxx does. I don't use it for mtb but when I'm splitboarding out in the backcountry. I've had it for about 10 years and its had 2 battery updates in that time but I think the new battery is a 10 year life. I've also taken it to Alaska, Kashmir, Japan and the US on snowboard trips.

I don't see an issue with having one for MTB, especially if it gives you or your loved ones piece of mind. They take up stuff all room, weigh bugger all and from my experience in aviation they work.
I thought it was AMSA that looks after SARsat and AusSar
great bunch of people and very dedicated to their cause, I used to look after their genset and UPS's when I lived in Canberra
 

EsPeGe

Likes Dirt
I thought it was AMSA that looks after SARsat and AusSar
great bunch of people and very dedicated to their cause, I used to look after their genset and UPS's when I lived in Canberra
Sorry, shop talk. I deal with AusSar at work but yeah, AMSA is the overarching body.
 
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