Hacks

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tobbogonist

a registered member
Our whole place is full of 'hacks' at the moment. (Cannot get photos to upload, internet is very average at home)

Front gate is held up with star pickets, wire and a railroad sleeper cut into thirds and half sunk into the ground.

Hot water is run through an instant camping heater, garden hose and various diameter ag pipe salvaged from work, along with all the other plumbing. There is a hastily knocked together water jacket for the fire but it's hot enough inside as it is through the summer.

Oven is mud we dug out of the hill, hardened and reinforced with wire framing.

Water tanks filling with run off from corrugated iron sheets framed up with old pallets. Tanks themselves are old stainless steel milk vats, gravity is my pump.

Electricity is a mix of old automatic door back up batteries, misc solar panels and car batteries (ones from our actual cars.. easier to charge phone in the car than drain the other batteries)

Washing machine is hooked up to a chain/sprocket, 30 mins of pedaling gets stuff reasonably clean, waiting on some parts at the moment so it's laundromat visits, machine couldn't handle my raw power. The kids bike a repurposed for the job has the smallest cranks I've ever seen.

Our Kitchen is made out of the Bunnings Kaboodle pallets they ship all their Flatpack kitchens on.

Bus is hastily framed out of pallet Wood, insulation I stole out of mums roof/scored for free as leftovers from worksites.

'fridge' is perishable items floated in water tanks, a deep dark hole for beers and containers full of beach sand which keep vegetables surprisingly fresh.

Old hardtail is set up running single speed (cassette was toast), front chainring is asymmetrical, cranks are not. Only held on with two bolts as holes don't match up, is enough to keep fitness up spinning through forestry back roads but would not want to put any actual load on it.

Every single normal everyday thing we used to take for granted is now either not possible or a complicated 10 step process.

Outdoor shower, panelled with windows I removed from the bus, lovely for the most part but did have a snake encounter a few weeks ago.. he didn't know I was in the shower..

We have been off grid for 6 months or so now although working most days on a farm so not much work is getting done at home.
For the first time in my 'being an adult' life I'm not stressed about anything. It's pretty good.
 

boyracer

Likes Dirt
Our whole place is full of 'hacks' at the moment. (Cannot get photos to upload, internet is very average at home)

Front gate is held up with star pickets, wire and a railroad sleeper cut into thirds and half sunk into the ground.

Hot water is run through an instant camping heater, garden hose and various diameter ag pipe salvaged from work, along with all the other plumbing. There is a hastily knocked together water jacket for the fire but it's hot enough inside as it is through the summer.

Oven is mud we dug out of the hill, hardened and reinforced with wire framing.

Water tanks filling with run off from corrugated iron sheets framed up with old pallets. Tanks themselves are old stainless steel milk vats, gravity is my pump.

Electricity is a mix of old automatic door back up batteries, misc solar panels and car batteries (ones from our actual cars.. easier to charge phone in the car than drain the other batteries)

Washing machine is hooked up to a chain/sprocket, 30 mins of pedaling gets stuff reasonably clean, waiting on some parts at the moment so it's laundromat visits, machine couldn't handle my raw power. The kids bike a repurposed for the job has the smallest cranks I've ever seen.

Our Kitchen is made out of the Bunnings Kaboodle pallets they ship all their Flatpack kitchens on.

Bus is hastily framed out of pallet Wood, insulation I stole out of mums roof/scored for free as leftovers from worksites.

'fridge' is perishable items floated in water tanks, a deep dark hole for beers and containers full of beach sand which keep vegetables surprisingly fresh.

Old hardtail is set up running single speed (cassette was toast), front chainring is asymmetrical, cranks are not. Only held on with two bolts as holes don't match up, is enough to keep fitness up spinning through forestry back roads but would not want to put any actual load on it.

Every single normal everyday thing we used to take for granted is now either not possible or a complicated 10 step process.

Outdoor shower, panelled with windows I removed from the bus, lovely for the most part but did have a snake encounter a few weeks ago.. he didn't know I was in the shower..

We have been off grid for 6 months or so now although working most days on a farm so not much work is getting done at home.
For the first time in my 'being an adult' life I'm not stressed about anything. It's pretty good.
Well done . Life’s too short to die wondering.
I had a visit from a mate last week who sold a suburban house and used the money to buy 120 acre bush block 12 months ago. Living in 2 small ply caravans No power, no plumbed water,heating bath water for his kids on open fire. Cooking on a bbq. Happiest I’ve ever seen him!
 

Flow-Rider

Burner
Our whole place is full of 'hacks' at the moment. (Cannot get photos to upload, internet is very average at home)

Front gate is held up with star pickets, wire and a railroad sleeper cut into thirds and half sunk into the ground.

Hot water is run through an instant camping heater, garden hose and various diameter ag pipe salvaged from work, along with all the other plumbing. There is a hastily knocked together water jacket for the fire but it's hot enough inside as it is through the summer.

Oven is mud we dug out of the hill, hardened and reinforced with wire framing.

Water tanks filling with run off from corrugated iron sheets framed up with old pallets. Tanks themselves are old stainless steel milk vats, gravity is my pump.

Electricity is a mix of old automatic door back up batteries, misc solar panels and car batteries (ones from our actual cars.. easier to charge phone in the car than drain the other batteries)

Washing machine is hooked up to a chain/sprocket, 30 mins of pedaling gets stuff reasonably clean, waiting on some parts at the moment so it's laundromat visits, machine couldn't handle my raw power. The kids bike a repurposed for the job has the smallest cranks I've ever seen.

Our Kitchen is made out of the Bunnings Kaboodle pallets they ship all their Flatpack kitchens on.

Bus is hastily framed out of pallet Wood, insulation I stole out of mums roof/scored for free as leftovers from worksites.

'fridge' is perishable items floated in water tanks, a deep dark hole for beers and containers full of beach sand which keep vegetables surprisingly fresh.

Old hardtail is set up running single speed (cassette was toast), front chainring is asymmetrical, cranks are not. Only held on with two bolts as holes don't match up, is enough to keep fitness up spinning through forestry back roads but would not want to put any actual load on it.

Every single normal everyday thing we used to take for granted is now either not possible or a complicated 10 step process.

Outdoor shower, panelled with windows I removed from the bus, lovely for the most part but did have a snake encounter a few weeks ago.. he didn't know I was in the shower..

We have been off grid for 6 months or so now although working most days on a farm so not much work is getting done at home.
For the first time in my 'being an adult' life I'm not stressed about anything. It's pretty good.
Make sure you have air meter alarms mate if you're burning fuels in confined spaces over the winter to keep warm, other than that enjoy your new life.
 

Litenbror

Eats Squid
So need a 140mm air shaft for a new Suntour Auron but replacing the 160mm shaft will be expensive ($85 air shaft + $40 postage) and take a few weeks for it to get here.

I'm wondering if it's worth just cutting down and rethreading the current air shaft to 140mm? The article below shows that the top cap and seal head can be removed so I could presumably then remove 20mm and tap the shaft for the seal head and top cap.


So stupid idea or worth it to save $125 and a few weeks?
 

slowmick

"I am over 1000 kg"
So need a 140mm air shaft for a new Suntour Auron but replacing the 160mm shaft will be expensive ($85 air shaft + $40 postage) and take a few weeks for it to get here.

I'm wondering if it's worth just cutting down and rethreading the current air shaft to 140mm? The article below shows that the top cap and seal head can be removed so I could presumably then remove 20mm and tap the shaft for the seal head and top cap.


So stupid idea or worth it to save $125 and a few weeks?
Paging Dr @beeb (who I think recently had success with his dad and his fox 36).
 

beeb

Dr. Beebenson, PhD HA, ST, Offset (hons)
It won't give you the correct torque because you are using it as a lever.
As long as the crows foot is at 90 degrees (as shown) it doesn’t alter the torque applied as the length of the “moment arm” isn’t effected.

There seems to be a bunch of different calculations available for if working with an offset, but 90 degrees is always no compensation required.
 
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