For a wheelie good time...

mike14

Likes Dirt
(Sorry about the pun)

I've never upgraded the wheels on any bike that I've owned, so my question is; what am I missing out on?
Would I feel the difference if I was to change up the wheels on my trail bike (currently running RaceFace Affect somethings (Z30?))? If so, what are some reputable upgrades that won't destroy the bank balance?
 

moorey

with a big stick
I’m sure there will be absolute consensus on this....

Personally, I only ride hope hubs. Affordable, strong, adaptable, sound nice....and absolutely reliable for me. Some sets coming up 20 years old. Rim wise, I’m a Stans arch or flow mk3 man. Light and strong.

It also depends what you’re doing. There’s nothing really wrong with the aeffect stuff for general use. Haven’t experienced the hubs, though the rims on my mates are a bit soft.

(I’m fussier about wheels than pretty much anything else on my bikes)
 

mike14

Likes Dirt
Cheers.
A mate has some very fancy wheels built around Hope hubs on his Ripmo, and the pedaling on that thing is incredible, but I've got no idea how much of that is the wheels vs the bike in general.
I've always just had the mindset of "as long as thet are round they are ok", but now I'm wondering how much better it can be (plus lockdown has me dreaming of changing things on the bike as I can't do much else with it!)
 

bear the bear

Is a real bear
Yes, higher POE, lighter overall weight, snappier response, stronger wheelset...
It depends on what components are used, and what the goal is.
What your budget is, will guide the recommendations
 

Dales Cannon

The Olden Dazed
Staff member
See if you can find out the specs of your current wheelset. Width, weight and poe cover most things but check hub specs too. Then see what is around that is lighter etc. POE is a personal thing and i have a set of American Classic that were pretty average in that regard but I really like them for overall weight and width. Also fan of stans rims and either DT Swiss or Hope hubs. The noise of the Hopes is very much a personal thing. I like my almost silent DT hub on the cannondale and the AC's arent much louder. The Hope on the Muru scares the seagulls away so that is a plus.

Stiffer, lighter and lower rolling inertia are all usually possible depending on your requirements, wishes and wallet.
 

moorey

with a big stick
@mike14 if not for lockdown, and running either 26 or 27.5, you’d be welcome to come loan a set and have a ride on my local loop.
But your in metro...and probably 29. At least lockdown is only temporary.
 

Oddjob

Can hench anywhere any time
Yes, higher POE, lighter overall weight, snappier response, stronger wheelset...
It depends on what components are used, and what the goal is.
What your budget is, will guide the recommendations
This. My favourite wheels are a set of asymmetric Praxis c32 rims laced to I9 Torch hubs. They are tough, lightish for 29ers and have 120 poe, but they were also a few thousand dollars.

You would get 80% of the performance lacing Hopes to Dt Ex511 rims for around $800.

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moorey

with a big stick
This. My favourite wheels are a set of asymmetric Praxis c32 rims laced to I9 Torch hubs. They are tough, lightish for 29ers and have 120 poe, but they were also a few thousand dollars.

You would get 80% of the performance lacing Hopes to Dt Ex511 rims for around $800.

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Correct. Except 90%. The i9 are gorgeous hubs, but you definitely pay for the engagement.
 

bear the bear

Is a real bear
This. My favourite wheels are a set of asymmetric Praxis c32 rims laced to I9 Torch hubs. They are tough, lightish for 29ers and have 120 poe, but they were also a few thousand dollars.

You would get 80% of the performance lacing Hopes to Dt Ex511 rims for around $800.

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Only torch ;)
I am after some real-world feedback on the new I9 hydra's with 690 poe
 

the drizzle

Likes Bikes and Dirt
If you are considering carbon hoops, Nextie have a stock page that is regularly updated with good priced rims. Shipping is $40us on that page.

They also sell rims on a second website which has free global shipping, it was suggested to me by a nextie representative when enquiring about stock rims. Even though the second website doesn't list the stronger ''enduro' layup you can request it at no extra cost.

I'm in the process of building some of these rims up with hope hubs purchased from Merlin for bang on $1000.

Rodent last set of nexties for two years, pretty hard without issues.



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the drizzle

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Only torch ;)
I am after some real-world feedback on the new I9 hydra's with 690 poe
I'll get back to you after the Melbourne lockdown, hard to give real world feedback riding footpaths. Looks identical to the torch it replaced but a much quieter buzz, will get louder with use I assume

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bear the bear

Is a real bear
I'll get back to you after the Melbourne lockdown, hard to give real world feedback riding footpaths. Looks identical to the torch it replaced but a much quieter buzz, will get louder with use I assume

Sent from my Mi 9T using Tapatalk
My concern is similar to the DT Swiss 54T after it came out. There were numerous internet reports of teeth shearing etc.
I have a run a DT Swiss 54t for about 5 years now with 0 issues, but the number for I9 is significantly greater and precise with the machining required.
 

Oddjob

Can hench anywhere any time
Only torch ;)
I am after some real-world feedback on the new I9 hydra's with 690 poe
Ali Clarkson is happy to use Torch hubs but isn't willing to use Hydras yet.

Personally 120 poe is enough. The instant or near instant engagement of Hydras, Onyx or Stealth would create too much pedal kickback.

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Last edited:

slimjim1

Likes Dirt
I'd be looking at DT wheels and maybe Hunt wheels as well, depending on budget.

Having owned both Hope pro 4/Arch combo and DT wheels (350 hub with 36 tooth upgrade), have to say i preferred the DT's. Didn't really notice the difference in engagement between the two (noticeably less than the I9's I have on one bike now, noticeably more than crappy stock hubs = nice compromise). Found the Stans rims a touch easier to dent and the DT hubs to be more reliable and easier to work on. Also preferred the sound of the DTs (waiting for triggered Hope fanbois ;)).
 

komdotkom

Likes Dirt
I've got a few sets of Hope Pro 4's in the fleet and the rest are DT's, the DT's are simpler to maintain and more reliable but are a bit boring from a style point of view. I only run 350's because I can't see the sense of spending the extra on 240's to save a very small amount of weight at the centre of the wheel. I always run the 54T ratchet and have never had an issue but you need to factor this into the purchase price because they are woeful with the standard 18T ratchet. This makes the Hopes slightly cheaper I reckon because the DT ratchet upgrade is about $130 these days.
I can't really comment on alloy rims, I'm a carbon fanboi.
 

rowdyflat

chez le médecin
Weight and inertia is the main thing but worse anyway with bigger wheels sizes ie 29er.
Engagement if pedalling slowly .
Rim width only if using big tyres at lowish pressures < 24 psi.IMO. Most of the local eggbeaters have 35psi +!!!!!
Tyres are the thing that really varies the most.
Width, weight and poe cover most things
Yep he said it first.
 

EsPeGe

Likes Dirt
The instant or near instant engagement of Hydras, Onyx or Stealth would create too much pedal kickback.
Mate I own 4 sets of Onyx because I detest noisy freehubs, can't say I've ever noticed pedal kickback at all and I am very attuned to what my bike is doing. And that instant engagement is mint!!!! I have a shitty set of DT swiss wheels with a freehub that can be nearly 1/3 of a crank before they engage and they are fucking terrible.

As for the OP I like DTSwiss rims or Stans. I also liked Lightbicycle Carbons but had a terrible experience on a brand new rim and their after sales service was shithouse which sadly seems more the case, they were better the first set I had. Hubs-wise, as mentioned above I'm an Onyx hub guy all the way. Silence, instant engagement, and bulletproof. Downside is they are heavy, even the new Vespers carry a bit of weight and are not fucking cheap, around $1200 at the mo.
 

goobags

Likes Dirt
It’s pretty much been answered but I upgraded wheels for two main reasons. POE and rim internal width. 18 POE is terrible. 40 or 44 POE whatever it is with Hope is the minimum I would run and I run Pro 4s and Pro 2 evos. They’re and affordable robust hub with parts available. Colour options too if you’re inclined so they’re a bit of a no brainer.

Rims is have carbonfan and light bicycle. Neither of them are very light with the light bicycles are really damn heavy but they are both bomb proof. I run 30mm internal on 2.5” or 2.4” tyres. I would only run down to 25mm on XC style 2.2” tyres if I were to get another XC bike.

Is it worth it? It’s a hard to answer. I will keep my two wheel sets for as long as I can. Touch wood they haven’t given me any trouble. If I was looking at new wheels now I would question it financially. But mates seem to be going to factory alloy rims at a rate lately so no doubt I would too.


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itsajoke

Likes Dirt
I am after some real-world feedback on the new I9 hydra's with 690 poe
Hey @bear the bear , the Hydras are very nice but the expense would make most people stay away. I could, so I did, but they are not light years ahead of the DT 240s they replaced.
We have some sections that require ratcheting and knowing that you will hit the mark every time makes line selection less of a chore. I use the Dumond oil so they are slightly louder than the grease but nowhere near a DT loud. The front rolls for a long time but when you ride them they do not stand out. That’s a good thing in my book.
If you can, why not?
 
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