Electric Vehicles etc

Stredda

Runs naked through virgin scrub
^^^^ THAT is the solution. Effective public transport is the only way, at least for major cities. Just supplanting our current ICE fleet for an EV fleet = planet still fucked, probably even more so given the enormous environmental costs involved in manufacturing new vehicles and disposing of the old ones.
Yep, as much as we all like our own personal vehicles, if we are truly want the most effective, environmentally responsible form of transport, public transport is it. It will be a big ask for everyone in urban areas to give up their cars and just as much of a challenge to redesign our cities with public transport in mind.
Tassie is not all that urban but public transport is still pretty poor.
 

Haakon

Call me Ken, whoreken
I wish Hobart still had its trams…

When I last lived in Melbourne, I was inner west suburbs and my car did about 2-3000kms a year and most of that was driving to the country to see my olds. Train to work in the city, walk home sometimes. Supermarket was walking distance. Not much we needed a car for, could have been very happy with a share car subscription, only really had the cars because I’m a chronic petrol head and they’re my toys…
 

Scotty T

2.6 inches
@beeb I don't advocate for replacement of the current fleet with electric, reducing the use of personal cars is a huge thing we have to do, and harder than replacing what we have with electric because people are entitled (to at least one car for each driver in the family with over 700km range yeeha don't ruin my weekend greenie fuckers). But if a new vehicle has to exist it must be electric, which now can be done.

probably even more so given the enormous environmental costs involved in manufacturing new vehicles and disposing of the old ones.
Nope, lifecycle emissions on ICE cars will always be much higher. Most cars nowadays are in the bin after 10 years, 15 if you really stretch it out and spend heaps keeping it going. If we just stop making ICE now, within 15 years most of it happens just the way it does now with people buying new cars and disposing old ones. Except we can pull batteries out of electic cars and put new ones in pretty easily, and we can re-use the old batteries for stationary power, and we can then recycle a lot of the materials in them when they completely run out.

Whose main family car on here is over 10 years old? We only have one and it is 7, it will be moved on by the time it is 10.

It will be a big ask for everyone in urban areas to give up their cars and just as much of a challenge to redesign our cities with public transport in mind.
Public transport is the future of getting to and from work, and working from home at least sometimes for every single person that can do it. But e-bikes could play a bigger role if we didn't make them a shit option because of the laws.

Electric bikes need to scrap the 25km/h limit, and we need cycling infrastructure to support them. The limit is holding people back from e-bike commuting. I'm a reasonable cyclist and can sit on 35 on the flat on a good normal bike (obviously working up a sweat) and of course regularly hit over 40 riding down hills on cycle paths. I think I need to do some lobbying on this locally.

We also need to stop bringing our children up thinking they need the fredom of a car as soon as they can drive and it's some kind of rite of passage. A lot are doing it for themselves, realising that cars are bad for the environment, realising they have better things to spend their money on, and still surviving with PT, e-bikes, family and mates giving lifts and Uber as my son does right now. He is actually nearly 23, has no interest in getting a licence, and when he eventually does (which he'll prolly need to do for work this year) he won't get his own car because it's a waste of money to him.
 

Cardy George

Piercing rural members since 1981
@beeb I don't advocate for replacement of the current fleet with electric, reducing the use of personal cars is a huge thing we have to do, and harder than replacing what we have with electric because people are entitled (to at least one car for each driver in the family with over 700km range yeeha don't ruin my weekend greenie fuckers). But if a new vehicle has to exist it must be electric, which now can be done.



Nope, lifecycle emissions on ICE cars will always be much higher. Most cars nowadays are in the bin after 10 years, 15 if you really stretch it out and spend heaps keeping it going. If we just stop making ICE now, within 15 years most of it happens just the way it does now with people buying new cars and disposing old ones. Except we can pull batteries out of electic cars and put new ones in pretty easily, and we can re-use the old batteries for stationary power, and we can then recycle a lot of the materials in them when they completely run out.

Whose main family car on here is over 10 years old? We only have one and it is 7, it will be moved on by the time it is 10.



Public transport is the future of getting to and from work, and working from home at least sometimes for every single person that can do it. But e-bikes could play a bigger role if we didn't make them a shit option because of the laws.

Electric bikes need to scrap the 25km/h limit, and we need cycling infrastructure to support them. The limit is holding people back from e-bike commuting. I'm a reasonable cyclist and can sit on 35 on the flat on a good normal bike (obviously working up a sweat) and of course regularly hit over 40 riding down hills on cycle paths. I think I need to do some lobbying on this locally.

We also need to stop bringing our children up thinking they need the fredom of a car as soon as they can drive and it's some kind of rite of passage. A lot are doing it for themselves, realising that cars are bad for the environment, realising they have better things to spend their money on, and still surviving with PT, e-bikes, family and mates giving lifts and Uber as my son does right now. He is actually nearly 23, has no interest in getting a licence, and when he eventually does (which he'll prolly need to do for work this year) he won't get his own car because it's a waste of money to him.
Don't disagree with what your are saying but a couple of considerations. Electric cars are still cars underneath, things like suspension etc will still wear out so its probably not as simple as just replacing the battery, there will still be a consumerist aspect to it, and the current trend of dispose instead of repair is going to get worse as fewer people are brought up learning to repair.

Secondly, and again I dont disagree, but if you live outside of a metro area Public Transport simply doesn't exist. My kids will probably end up with their own cars simply so they can go to work.

Finally, our car is 8 years old. We use our cars until there is no longer the business case for them, so hopefully another 8 years. I don't intend to replace it with another ICE, but there is simply no infrastructure to support us, and I don't see that improving in the life span of our car.
 

dancaseyimages

Mountain bike pornographer
We also need to stop bringing our children up thinking they need the fredom of a car as soon as they can drive and it's some kind of rite of passage. A lot are doing it for themselves, realising that cars are bad for the environment, realising they have better things to spend their money on, and still surviving with PT, e-bikes, family and mates giving lifts and Uber as my son does right now. He is actually nearly 23, has no interest in getting a licence, and when he eventually does (which he'll prolly need to do for work this year) he won't get his own car because it's a waste of money to him.
I agree with this, my friend recently bought an apartment, yes it was close to a million dollars (2 beddy), but it comes with a range of resources located in Canberra.
They have hire bikes, MTB's (Treks....), indoor pool, cinema, salt water pool, sauna, bar, Tesla's and a truck for moving.
I personally think its a great lifestyle if that's what your after, its a place where you don't want or need for more, its right in the heart of Canberra, Kingston Foreshore where all the trendy places are and as with any apartment its more about spending your time outside.
 

Scotty T

2.6 inches
Don't disagree with what your are saying but a couple of considerations. Electric cars are still cars underneath, things like suspension etc will still wear out so its probably not as simple as just replacing the battery, there will still be a consumerist aspect to it, and the current trend of dispose instead of repair is going to get worse as fewer people are brought up learning to repair.

Secondly, and again I dont disagree, but if you live outside of a metro area Public Transport simply doesn't exist. My kids will probably end up with their own cars simply so they can go to work.

Finally, our car is 8 years old. We use our cars until there is no longer the business case for them, so hopefully another 8 years. I don't intend to replace it with another ICE, but there is simply no infrastructure to support us, and I don't see that improving in the life span of our car.
Yep all are worthy considerations.

I wasn't thinking a much longer life span for EV's, more an overall reduction in the footprint because we can repurpose the battery, whether a new one goes in the car or the car goes to the wrecker, still an overall win compared to ICE.

I agree they will suffer the same wear and tear as ICE but certainly the potential is there with Tesla's agile model allowing a longer lifespan for their cars. One example is all the buttons are updateable software on a single touch screen, and not a $3000 replacement of the entire panel because the volume control doesn't work, a typical thing I've heard in ten year old or more cars.
 

Scotty T

2.6 inches
I agree with this, my friend recently bought an apartment, yes it was close to a million dollars (2 beddy), but it comes with a range of resources located in Canberra.
They have hire bikes, MTB's (Treks....), indoor pool, cinema, salt water pool, sauna, bar, Tesla's and a truck for moving.
I personally think its a great lifestyle if that's what your after, its a place where you don't want or need for more, its right in the heart of Canberra, Kingston Foreshore where all the trendy places are and as with any apartment its more about spending your time outside.
My mate lives (rents) there, the Tesla is a dual motor, he's checking out the T&C's because he thinks you need to be a member of the gym to use it for free but I'm hella keen :D
 

dancaseyimages

Mountain bike pornographer
My mate lives (rents) there, the Tesla is a dual motor, he's checking out the T&C's because he thinks you need to be a member of the gym to use it for free but I'm hella keen :D
Yeah they have a few more on order, my mates been pushing for more at their owners corp meeting ;)
He took the Tesla to take his bike to Stromlo to not get his own car muddy/scratch the plastics while it was for sale.
 

dancaseyimages

Mountain bike pornographer
My triton is 10 years old and has cost me fuck all to keep going.

Granted, I'm holding onto it because im hopefull of a decent electric replacement soon. But not all cars are dead after 10 years
My Rodeo is from 1991, but sadly she blew the gearbox almost a year ago. Got a few LS1 parts for it but thought for the $161 for twleve months of historic rego without the pits needed, now we can travel and Sydney the Covid capital it once was, should be a cheap fix for a few more years of motoring.
Bonus of utes, is the loading zone parking, parliamentary triangle in Canberra saves $15 a day minimum, and especially Sydney CBD.
 

Stredda

Runs naked through virgin scrub
My triton is 10 years old and has cost me fuck all to keep going.

Granted, I'm holding onto it because im hopefull of a decent electric replacement soon. But not all cars are dead after 10 years
My Triton lasted 11 years and the head cracked, so I offloaded it cheap to a mechanic who was planning to do all the work himself to fix it. It had 360,000km on the clock.
 

rowdyflat

chez le médecin
2 utes 1992 and 2003 ,Forester 2003.
So when we bought a 2019 Nissan Leaf it was so modern we didnt know ourselves.
They are fairly simple a computer, electric motor and batteries.
Also air conditioner and suspension and wheel bearings .
Brakes not used much due to e pedal engine regen braking .
No cooling , lubrication , starter motor , gears , clutch or drive shaft.
Electric motors have virtually no moving parts and are much more efficient and simpler than ICE so overall not really needing servicing .
I agree though that ebikes and public transport are extremely efficient forms of transport especially around cities and the dumbing down of road rules around ebikes reflects Australia's obsession with the car and the nanny state.
Generally much of rural Australia is poorly educated, Australians are very conservative about change and think very short term, many of our current migrants are also conservative ,we have very few visionary politicians to drive policy, so its economics and the market that has the best hope of influencing transport and thats why I think the rising price of fuel is a good thing" long may it reign."
 

tubby74

Likes Bikes and Dirt
I agree with this, my friend recently bought an apartment, yes it was close to a million dollars (2 beddy), but it comes with a range of resources located in Canberra.
They have hire bikes, MTB's (Treks....), indoor pool, cinema, salt water pool, sauna, bar, Tesla's and a truck for moving.
I personally think its a great lifestyle if that's what your after, its a place where you don't want or need for more, its right in the heart of Canberra, Kingston Foreshore where all the trendy places are and as with any apartment its more about spending your time outside.
sounds like a well through out development. would be interested to see how it goes over time, will people on the strata continue to support those shared resources or try to lower fees.
 

dancaseyimages

Mountain bike pornographer
sounds like a well through out development. would be interested to see how it goes over time, will people on the strata continue to support those shared resources or try to lower fees.
Its part hotel so I'm not totally sure how its going to go in the future. The viability of an apartment is until the builders warranty runs out I was told which is around 5-7 years.
*I've never lived in one so not sure how they age over time, but I did do a project on the original Bega flats in Canberra which were a hip and futuristic project back in the 1980's, took 15 years to turn into a majority of Government owned flats due to the economy at the time enabling house purchases to be viable and affordable for most.
Fashion has a cycle of 20 years, so is housing the same?
 

Haakon

Call me Ken, whoreken
Its part hotel so I'm not totally sure how its going to go in the future. The viability of an apartment is until the builders warranty runs out I was told which is around 5-7 years.
*I've never lived in one so not sure how they age over time, but I did do a project on the original Bega flats in Canberra which were a hip and futuristic project back in the 1980's, took 15 years to turn into a majority of Government owned flats due to the economy at the time enabling house purchases to be viable and affordable for most.
Fashion has a cycle of 20 years, so is housing the same?
Is that Nishi? I worked there for a while a few years back. Shit of an office… Horrible sardines desk layout and the windows would randomly open over the freeway so you’d have to manually over ride them close so you could hear yourself think!
 

dancaseyimages

Mountain bike pornographer
Is that Nishi? I worked there for a while a few years back. Shit of an office… Horrible sardines desk layout and the windows would randomly open over the freeway so you’d have to manually over ride them close so you could hear yourself think!
Kingsborough, village.
Home | Kingsborough Village
Theres currently proposals apart from the usual AirBNB for a permit to operate as a hotel (currently the body corp operate a certain amount of apartments as permanent AirBNB's).
Part of buying in or even renting maybe is you get to be a part of all the facilities around apart from the usual apartment amenities gym, bbq, cinema, theres the wellness spa and a whole heap of cafes who deliver direct to your room.
 
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Haakon

Call me Ken, whoreken
Kingsborough, village.
Home | Kingsborough Village
Theres currently proposals apart from the usual AirBNB for a permit to operate as a hotel (currently the body corp operate a certain amount of apartments as permanent AirBNB's).
Part of buying in or even renting maybe is you get to be a part of all the facilities around apart from the usual apartment amenities gym, bbq, cinema, theres the wellness spa and a whole heap of cafes who deliver direct to your room.
Yeah, and I bet you’re paying through the nose for all that stuff…
 

ozzybmx

call me Cáitín
What's wrong with you lot :oops:

Bloody tree huggers wishing a further hike in fuel prices !

I like to head up to my holiday shack a couple of times a month to ride, cut the grass and get on the beers.

If diesel was $5 a litre, I might have to limit the 550km round trip once a month.

Over $300 trip in a loaded V8 cruiser, fckn car NEARLY drinking more $$$ on fuel than I spend on beer while up there ;)
 
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