Electric Vehicles etc

Scotty T

2.6 inches
I reckon while humans are still driving, riding and walking on roads FSD won't be a thing. Bit like living on Mars.
 

Squidfayce

Eats Squid
Autopilot, Enhanced Autopilot and Full Self-Driving Capability Features
Autopilot is a suite of driver assistance features that comes standard with the purchase of a new car or can be purchased after delivery, and brings new functionality to your Tesla that makes driving safer and less stressful. Available packages include:

Autopilot
Autopilot includes the following functionality and features:

Traffic-Aware Cruise Control: Matches the speed of your car to that of the surrounding traffic
Autosteer: Assists in steering within a clearly marked lane, and uses traffic-aware cruise control

Enhanced Autopilot
In addition to the functionality and features of Autopilot, Enhanced Autopilot also includes:

Navigate on Autopilot: Actively guides your car from a highway’s on-ramp to off-ramp, including suggesting lane changes, navigating interchanges, automatically engaging the turn signal and taking the correct exit.
Auto Lane Change: Assists in moving to an adjacent lane on the highway when Autosteer is engaged.
Autopark: Helps automatically parallel or perpendicular park your car, with a single touch.
Summon: Moves your car in and out of a tight space using the mobile app or key.
Smart Summon: Your car will navigate more complex environments and parking spaces, maneuvering around objects as necessary to come find you in a parking lot.

Full Self-Driving Capability
In addition to the functionality and features of Autopilot and Enhanced Autopilot, Full Self-Driving Capability also includes:

Traffic and Stop Sign Control (Beta): Identifies stop signs and traffic lights and automatically slows your car to a stop on approach, with your active supervision
Upcoming:
Autosteer on city streets
The currently enabled Autopilot, Enhanced Autopilot and Full Self-Driving features require active driver supervision and do not make the vehicle autonomous. Full autonomy will be dependent on achieving reliability far in excess of human drivers as demonstrated by billions of miles of experience, as well as regulatory approval, which may take longer in some jurisdictions. As Tesla’s Autopilot, Enhanced Autopilot and Full Self-Driving capabilities evolve, your car will be continuously upgraded through over-the-air software updates.
 

Squidfayce

Eats Squid
I think the key to the above is this -

"Full autonomy will be dependent on achieving reliability far in excess of human drivers as demonstrated by billions of miles of experience, as well as regulatory approval, which may take longer in some jurisdictions."

They are collecting the data and iterating on the capability all the time. At some point they will be able to prove their car is statistically safer on its own than a human driver. When they can do that, they will convince some country to let it loose and then we will see. But i'd expect by that point the system will be suitable for autonomous driving and will hit kids les soften than human drivers :)
 

wesdadude

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Tesla's self-driving capabilities are underdeveloped and oversold. They shouldn't be tested by unqualified enthusiasts on public roads.

They may be able to ship updates but they still have magnitudes more indicents than the rest of the industry.
 

Calvin27

Eats Squid
I figured long haul heavy truck would be last to go, maybe I was wrong.
long haul actually makes more sense than consumer EV.

They have defined routes, defined and legislated stops and they already weight a crapload. At each end of their journey they have to be loaded and unloaded which makes a great pairing with charging.

Having said that though, I think they are a better fit for hydrogen.
 

Haakon

Just call me Elon
Having said that though, I think they are a better fit for hydrogen.
On a technical basis perhaps... Yes, BEV trucks lose cargo capacity (which is lost money) and lose range (which with legislated stops may or may not be a problem), but at the end of the day its dollars per kms spent vs dollars per km earnt on cargo.

If the maths adds up, carrying smaller loads at perhaps a longer travel time may still be beneficial once the massively reduced operating costs come in.

Like all EV conversations, YMMV.
 

Stredda

Runs naked through virgin scrub
I figured long haul heavy truck would be last to go, maybe I was wrong.
You are going to have to rely on each truck manufacturer to make a compatible battery otherwise you'll have dozens of battery swap stations for each different battery. Your are also limited to that specific space claim when improvements in battery technology come along.
If you were to go full battery with current battery technology, a swap system would be the best solution but I just can't see all the major players agreeing to some "standard"
I think at this stage Nikola are on the right track with a fuel cell.
 

beeb

Dr. Beebenson, PhD HA, ST, Offset (hons)
You are going to have to rely on each truck manufacturer to make a compatible battery otherwise you'll have dozens of battery swap stations for each different battery. Your are also limited to that specific space claim when improvements in battery technology come along.
If you were to go full battery with current battery technology, a swap system would be the best solution but I just can't see all the major players agreeing to some "standard"
I think at this stage Nikola are on the right track with a fuel cell.
In the case of the Janus model, it wouldn't be the vehicle manufacturer supplying the battery - it would be Janus. Trucks are pretty much all still ladder-chassis, so as long as you have sufficient clearance underneath for the L-shaped battery pictured it should be fine (most trucks have fuel tank mounted in the same space, though they typically don't wrap under the chassis). The truck manufacturer would just be supplying a rolling shell. American (or formerly American) trucks can often be bought with different drivetrains, so buying a rolling shell or EV-spec'd chassis wouldn't be a leap.
 

Haakon

Just call me Elon
You are going to have to rely on each truck manufacturer to make a compatible battery otherwise you'll have dozens of battery swap stations for each different battery. Your are also limited to that specific space claim when improvements in battery technology come along.
If you were to go full battery with current battery technology, a swap system would be the best solution but I just can't see all the major players agreeing to some "standard"
I think at this stage Nikola are on the right track with a fuel cell.
I am not a fan of battery swaps, it's just not a good idea on what is really a very complex component. Especially one where charging rates are getting very good very quickly.
 

Stredda

Runs naked through virgin scrub
Nikola was a scam though. never had any working tech. So i think thats a little further away than what could be done now.
The do have a truck that pretty close to production.
It was the founder and executive chairman Trevor Milton that made the out there claims to help boost stock. He's no longer part of the company.
 
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