Can too much suspension travel make riding DH difficult for intermediate rider ?

Looking at 170 / 180 travel, coming from 115 / 130, sure ascending will be slower but will I get bounced around going down?

Cheers
 

yuley95

Likes Bikes and Dirt
Looking at 170 / 180 travel, coming from 115 / 130, sure ascending will be slower but will I get bounced around going down?

Cheers
Nah - good suspension won’t ‘bounce’ - it will absorb impact. The downside of too much suspension is that it eats your input energy. IE pedalling or pumping energy can be absorbed by the suspension.
There is a whole world of geometry and suspension kinematics that’s need to be included in this discussion but I think the basic answer for you is no, you won’t get bounced around more with more travel (with the caveat that you need to set your suspension up properly)
 

pink poodle

aka stickchops
The suspense is killing me...

I actually like a bit of bounce (for want of what may be a more accurate word?) in my big rigs. I often like to pop off things and move around a bit rather than just bog down and plough. Sure I'm light years from riding in the ultra spring loaded style that seems to be popular among a lot of pro riders, but it's fun and lively.
 
Nah - good suspension won’t ‘bounce’ - it will absorb impact. The downside of too much suspension is that it eats your input energy. IE pedalling or pumping energy can be absorbed by the suspension.
There is a whole world of geometry and suspension kinematics that’s need to be included in this discussion but I think the basic answer for you is no, you won’t get bounced around more with more travel (with the caveat that you need to set your suspension up properly)
Is there a noticeable delay in the change or direction ie quick left to right turns with a DH bike or long travel enduro compared to your regular 150/160 enduro ?
 
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